Matthew Ammann

Student, Programmer, Flash Enthusiast

Cyborg P3600 Controller Setup on Windows 7

Hey, everyone. I originally wrote a review for this product on Amazon, but had to edit it because they don’t allow external links in their reviews. Here’s the full tutorial for how to get a P3600 controller working on a 64-bit version of Windows 7. The instructions will be virtually identical in 32-bit Windows 7.

This is a DirectInput controller. Since most new PC games only have support for XInput, here’s what you need to do to get this controller working on Windows 7 (it looks daunting at first, but the whole process should take about 20 minutes):

1) Download the drivers from here. It’s the “Cyborg Rumble Pad” (not the Xbox-360 Rumble Pad):
http://www.saitek.com/uk/down/drivers.php

2) Run the .exe file you just downloaded in COMPATIBILITY MODE for Windows Vista. I can’t stress this enough! The controller will not work if you skip this step.

3) Make sure the rumble (force feedback) works by pressing any button in the configuration utility that gets opened during the setup. Make sure “Test Rumble Effects” checkbox is checked.

4) If the rumble works, go to step 6. If it doesn’t work, follow the instructions in the first post of this thread from the Saitek forums.

5) After doing that, type dxdiag in the Start menu search & run it. On the Input tab, your controller should be listed. This is what the correct listing should say:

Device Name: Saitek Cyborg Rumble Pad
Force Feedback Driver: C:\Windows\system32\Sai3F51A.dll

6) Download x360ce, which is the emulator that will allow us to use the controller with games that use XInput. At the time of this writing, the file you want is named “x360ce.App-2.0.2.163.zip”. Download link: http://code.google.com/p/x360ce/downloads/list

7) Extract and run the .exe file inside of the zip file you just downloaded. Click “Yes” to the two prompts.

8) Choose “Search automatically for settings” and click Next. Click Finish after it finds the internet configuration.

9) Change the “Presets” dropdown box to “Saitek Cyborg Rumble Pad (Separate Triggers)” and click the Load button. Click Save, and you’re done! Here’s what your setup should look like:

x360ce Settings for the Saitek P3600

x360ce Settings for the Saitek P3600

To use the controller with XInput games, simply copy the x360ce.exe, x360ce.ini, and xinput1_3.dll files to the same folder as your game .exe. If you’re not sure how to do that, check out the x360ce wiki. It has a game compatibility list & a “how do I use this” page with troubleshooting & screenshots.

After I had everything set up correctly, using this controller was amazing. It felt like I’d been using it for years, and I don’t regret taking the extra time to get it working properly. You can even swap the D-Pad & analog stick position in-game and it will still work as expected. It takes a little bit of initial setup to get this controller up & running correctly, but I hope my steps will save you some time!

ThinkPads and SSDs Part 3: Windows 7 Config and Power Settings

OCZ Debacle

I know it has been awhile since I posted Part 2, but the reason I’ve held off on writing this part is because I was in the middle of returning my 120 GB Vertex 3 Max IOPS to OCZ. Unfortunately, their customer service is mind-bogglingly bad. The first rep I was in contact with about my initial RMA request was clearly contracted from Asia and wouldn’t address the questions in my ticket. After a week had gone by and I was getting nowhere, I PM’d one of the American reps on the OCZ forums for assistance, but the service was almost as bad. Every time I asked about something, he had to ask the West Coast office about it (he was a remote customer service rep). After five weeks of back-and-forth communications trying to find out whether or not OCZ had replacement cases ready for Lenovo notebooks, I’d had enough. I asked for a refund, and now am sporting an OWC 6G Extreme Pro 120GB drive instead. It is just as fast as my Vertex 3, and I won’t have to deal with OCZ ever again.

If you have a Vertex 3 and are considering returning it for 1/16 inch skinnier casing, I strongly urge you to reconsider. You will save yourself days of time & frustration accepting and dealing with the casing as-is.


This is the final part of a three-part guide I’ve created that is designed to help users get the best performance out of their ThinkPads using Solid State Drives.

Disclaimer: I am not liable for any damage or problems that come about as a result of following this guide. I highly doubt anything negative will result, but I like to have my legal bases covered.

Part 1: Preparation
Part 2: Hard Drive Swapping and Windows 7 Installation
Part 3: Windows 7 Configuration and SSD tweaks

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ThinkPads and SSDs Part 2: Hard Drive Swapping and Windows 7 Installation

This is part two of a guide I’m creating that is designed to help users get the best performance out of their ThinkPads using Solid State Drives. The guide is split up into three parts. This is part two.

Disclaimer: I am not liable for any damage or problems that come about as a result of following this guide. I highly doubt anything negative will result, but I like to have my legal bases covered.

Part 1: Preparation
Part 2: Hard Drive Swapping and Windows 7 Installation
Part 3: Windows 7 Config and Power Settings

Abbreviation Guide:

  • SSD = Solid-State Drive
  • HDD = Hard Disk Drive
  • OS = Operating System
  • OEM = Original Equipment Manufacturer

UPDATE (7/13/11) – Added more details about deleting ProgramData. Typo fixed in the command-line arguments to create a junction.

Your laptop has finally arrived! Here’s a rough outline of what I’ll be covering in this part of the guide:

SECTION A: Before Removal of Stock Hard Drive

SECTION B: Hard Drive Swapping

SECTION C: Windows 7 Installation

 

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ThinkPads and SSDs Part 1: Preparation

Hello, everyone! I just bought a new ThinkPad W520, and I’d like to give a provide a guide of sorts for people wondering how to get the best performance from their ThinkPad. This is also meant to demonstrate a number of things you can do ahead of time, while waiting for your laptop to be built/shipped.

Disclaimer: I am not liable for any damage or problems that come about as a result of following this guide. I highly doubt anything negative will result, but I like to have my legal bases covered.

The guide is split up into three parts. The first part is about all the stuff you can do before your laptop gets here, so that you can jump right in with more important things when it arrives. The second part is about Windows 7 Installation, and physically installing your SSD or replacement hard drive. Part three will be Windows 7 configuration and creating a profile for your SSD in the Lenovo Power Manager.

Part 1: Preparation
Part 2: Hard Drive Swapping and Windows 7 Installation
Part 3: Windows 7 Config and Power Settings

Abbreviation Guide:

  • SSD = Solid-State Drive
  • OS = Operating System

UPDATE (5/30/11) – Added a section for creating a Bootable USB Installation. I also added a link to Part 2, which is now available.

It’s time to prep for our new arrival! Read more of this post

How To Make an Animated PNG

What is a PNG? .PNG is a file format for pictures (like JPG). PNGs have good compression and zero loss of image quality. They are the successor to JPGs, and hopefully more and more people will continue to use this format.

You know how .GIF files can be animated so that it looks like the picture is moving? There’s a new format out called APNG (Animated PNG) that will retain the high quality of your images instead of reducing them to a crummy looking 256-color GIF file. Before you get too excited, just keep in mind that it doesn’t have a lot of Application support…yet. As far as Internet browsers are concerned, new versions of Opera and Firefox support it, but Internet Explorer doesn’t. Here’s a more comprehensive list of the applications you can use with APNGs: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/APNG#Application_support

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